Topic: Real Bai Ji Guan?

It actually was not until recently (past few months), when through a discussion on teachat from a couple of members on this Forum ( I believe Will and Brandon), that I heard a rumor that more Traditional Bai Ji Guan should be orange in color instead of the traditional brownish black of most Wuyi Yancha.  The orange color seems to be closer to the color found in Hong Cha consisting of mostly buds or very young leaves.  As such I have the following questions:

What online vendors carry this style?  ( In a quick google Teasprings was one of the first to show up and it is actually an orange color)

If you happen to get a Bai Ji Guan of this style would you brew it differently than other Wuyi Yancha?


Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/wby/teadrunk.org/include/parser.php on line 791

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/wby/teadrunk.org/include/parser.php on line 791

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/wby/teadrunk.org/include/parser.php on line 791

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/wby/teadrunk.org/include/parser.php on line 791

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/wby/teadrunk.org/include/parser.php on line 791

Re: Real Bai Ji Guan?

I would call it a greenish-yellow, more than an orange (with red edges, depending on the level of oxidation, same as with any yancha). And the color will show more when the leaves are brewed, obviously. I have seen supposed baijiguan that's green too. I think part of it is that the leaves are only yellow when picked early, but I don't know where I heard that. It comes across differently in photos, so really hard to describe unless you've seen it in person.

The brownish-black color you're talking about (in the dry leaf) has more to do with the level of roast. We're talking about a yellowish leaf vs. a greener leaf, but then varying amounts of roast on top of that. Most baijiguan I've had has been fairly low-fire, but there are high-fire examples. It is comparatively rare, and usually also comparatively expensive (if genuine). However, a lot of people don't really love the taste.

I might brew a baijiguan of this style perhaps a little more delicately, but really just barely -- almost like a dancong.

Re: Real Bai Ji Guan?

I will definitely keep that in mind, when I manage to get some.  Yes, the brown black definitely comes from roast, but even the rather lightly roasted Yancha I have had, are never that vibrant in color, and would still be a quite subdued green (not bright like very green TGY).