1

(2 replies, posted in Chinese Teaware / 中国茶器)

Hard to say... I think modern products with this logo are just inspired by the old company.
But I saw some Zhu Ni teapots from Houde Tea, that were declared to be from 80'.. and had this seal on them.
I searched the whole internet (including blog you mentioned :) ) but I didn't find anything about this company after 1939...

2

(2 replies, posted in Chinese Teaware / 中国茶器)

Does anyone know the history of 金鼎商标?
I heard it was founded in 1919, but I'm not sure. But what was then? Did it exist only in the firs half of the century?
I'm interested, because I have seen a lot of teapots, that were declared to be from 70-80', and they had a company logo on them. Also there are a lot of modern products with the logo. So, are they copies? Or company still exists?
If you have any source of information or know something it would be great.

3

(17 replies, posted in Chinese Teaware / 中国茶器)

So it seems it's just some crazy mix of sand and clay.
Anyway thanks for the answer!

4

(17 replies, posted in Chinese Teaware / 中国茶器)

Thank you for answers, Charles!
Recently I have seen a teapot made from some strange material that was named 清宫御用金砂配方 by the seller.
Do you know something about this clay/mix?

5

(17 replies, posted in Chinese Teaware / 中国茶器)

Thank you for the info, William!
As I understood from Charles article Heixingni has dark dots and it can by original (old) or artificial (with manganese).
I have seen some teapots that were named Heini by the seller and had completly black colour. But I thought they were made of common Zini, and had that colour because of manganese, and maybe because of firing with a lack of oxigen. Perhaps colour depends on how much of manganese is added to the clay? Less - dots, lot - completly black? Though the structure of the material in these cases seems different to me. When it has dots it's usualy heavy, surface is like a stone. But most of completely black teapots didn't have the same quality, they were light sometimes and didn't feel really solid.
Pinzini (as far as I know) is a type of mixed zini, it usually has some bigger particles in it. And also can have almost black colour, but maybe I'm not right.
BTW, world of zisha clays seems to me as a very interesting adventure, even bigger than teas :)

6

(17 replies, posted in Chinese Teaware / 中国茶器)

OK, Wuni is Heini. But I thought Heini is just a name that used to describe clay by its colour. And can't be used as a correct name for a specific type of clay. Now I'm a little confused :-)
Let's try to make it clear.
Zisha can be divided into Zini, Luni and Zhuni. Duanni is also a specific type of clay, when Zini is mixed (in natural way) with Luni. So it's clear with Zhuni, Luni and Duanni.
Zini has these types:
- Zini itself
- Hongni
- Dicaoqing
Am I right? Is it all, or are there any other kindes of clay like wuni? And if so, where do they (which group) belong. I'm asking because I have heard many different names for clays, but I don't know how to classify them.

Another question: I suppose blue colour of teapots is made in the same way as Muo luni? By adding cobalt oxide?
Thank you very much for answers, Charles! I hope I'm not annoying you, but you're the best informed person I have ever found on the internet.

7

(17 replies, posted in Chinese Teaware / 中国茶器)

Hello Charles!
You have mentioned Jiani (as an ore bed) and Di Cao Qing as a specifik type of Zi Ni, but what is Wuni? Some other kind of Zi Ni?

And second question. I have seen some yao bian pots made of Duan Ni, or Lu Ni... Anyway it was a porous clay, after firing it has a burned surface and it is not really porous and absorptive any more, so it's good for making oolongs for example. But I don't know if I can call this type of clays solid. So perhaps those pots were not made of pure Duan Ni or Lu Ni, do you think potters add some other types of clay to it? It looked pretty pure... just burned, but pure...