Topic: Famous Chinese Green Teas

The widely-circulated list of "10 Famous Teas of China" (中國十大名茶) has many versions, usually with the addition or subtraction of various teas.

The majority of the teas on the list, though, are Green Teas. 

The list from the Chinese Tea Culture Research Institute (via Wikipedia), which I recognize to be the most official of the current lists includes the following Green Teas:

-Xi Hu Longjing (West Lake Dragonwell)
-Dong Ting Bi Luo Chun (Dong Ting Green Spring Snail - side note, some confuse Dong Ting mt with Dong Ding mt in Taiwan - not the same)
-Huangshan Mao Feng (Huang Shan Hairy Peak)
-Taiping Hou Kui (Taiping Monkey tea)
-Liu An Gua Pian (Liu An melon pieces)
-Xin Yang Mao Jian (Xin Yang pointed green)

I have tried all of these and a good Bi Luo Chun is my favorite green tea.  It is getting harder to find really, really good and reasonably priced, authentic examples of these, as "imposter" teas (or teas produced elsewhere and brought into these areas for finishing) have flooded the market.

What Chinese green teas, on or off this list, have you tried and liked?

Re: Famous Chinese Green Teas

My favorites are Lu Shan Yun Wu, Tai Ping Hou Kui and Zhu Ye Qing

Since green tea has the longest history, it's quite understandable that greens dominate the list..tho I am an avid Oolong drinker :)

一杯一杯復一杯

Re: Famous Chinese Green Teas

Lu Shan Yun Wu! Love it.  Also love this video of one of my favorite connoisseurs James Norwood Pratt where he talks about Lu Shan and its magical character.

http://video.google.com/videosearch?cli … mp;tab=wv#

Re: Famous Chinese Green Teas

sorry, wrong link; try this for the James Norwood Pratt Lu Shan video:

http://bit.ly/gK3oB

Re: Famous Chinese Green Teas

As this is my first message on this forum, I though it would be appropriate to introduce my self briefly. I'm a technology student from Finland. Tea has been my favoride drink since as long as I can remember, but I have started to learn about the higher arts of tea brewing only recently. In Finland, coffee is much more widely consumed product than tea, but there are still some small groups of tea enthusiasts. There are also a few tea shops that sell quality loose leaf tea, but there are still some quality teas that I find hard to come by.

I have tried to find a good place to buy Lu Shan Yun Wu and original West Lake Lung Ching teas. If some one could recomend a good online shop where one could buy either one or both of these teas, I'd be most greatfull. From the articles that I've read, I gather that not everything that is sold as West Lake is really the original product. Imperial Tea Court sells some sort of Lung Ching. Has any one tasted it? Is it genuine West Lake tea?

Re: Famous Chinese Green Teas

TeaSpring sells both of the teas you mentioned, and I am pleased with the quality of their Chinese greens. I buy in the spring, but it manages to stay fairly appealing throughout the year with the air squeezed out.

Lu shan Yun wu is out of stock. On the authenticity of West Lake area Long Jing, I gather there is a broad area of tea production with certain regions designated as "protected." I could swear I have seen a government seal affixed, but I dont see it on TeaSpring's packaging. Being China, the sticker isn't a rock solid guarantee of anything - but it tastes pretty good to me.

Re: Famous Chinese Green Teas

I am getting intorduced to the wonders of Chinese Green Teas. I have tried the green tea from Fujian Anxi Eight horses tea company but cannont tell the name as it is in chinese and then I have had tea with only one name in english "Tongzhou". With this limited information, can someone help me find these teas in USA or elsewhere, where I can mail order. thanks,   dds

Re: Famous Chinese Green Teas

http://www.bamatea.com/cn/default.aspx

This seems to be the website for that company. From a quick glance, they do mostly oolongs, especially TGY (tie guanyin), which is usually a green oolong. You could check ebay for tea from this company, or just ask for suggestions for TGY from another American company. You might also like Baozhong oolong (pouchong) from Taiwan.

http://floatingleaves.com/ has good baozhong oolong, and many other companies also. You could also take pictures of your tea and post them, people might have more suggestions.

I couldn't find any products on their website which said tongzhou, do you see the characters 同州 or 通州 on the package?

红焙浅瓯新火活,龙团小碾斗晴窗

Re: Famous Chinese Green Teas

brandon wrote:

TeaSpring sells both of the teas you mentioned, and I am pleased with the quality of their Chinese greens. I buy in the spring, but it manages to stay fairly appealing throughout the year with the air squeezed out.

Lu shan Yun wu is out of stock. On the authenticity of West Lake area Long Jing, I gather there is a broad area of tea production with certain regions designated as "protected." I could swear I have seen a government seal affixed, but I dont see it on TeaSpring's packaging. Being China, the sticker isn't a rock solid guarantee of anything - but it tastes pretty good to me.

According to some Hangzhou tea farmers, seals are given to Hangzhou farmers based on how many hectares of tea field each family has, and one seal with pin number and water marks is given to estimated production of each 250g process tea. After I heard this, I recalled a few years ago, when I bought cans of 250g long jing, the cans did bear the standard seals whose numbers can be looked up online. But at other times when I bought small packs, there weren't standard seals coming with them. Currently when buying from Hangzhou farmers, they would provide the sticker seal for about each 250g of tea. If they don't offer, the buyers can always demand it. In regions out of Hangzhou, there is no such policy out of Hangzhou.

門前塵土三千丈,不到薰爐茗碗旁

Re: Famous Chinese Green Teas

3 teas I've tried: long jing, bi luo chun, liu an gua pian. The long jing was a royal gift from a friend who had bought it from the Wen family in Long Jing Village last year. Now the taste has faded, but the fragrance is still stunning -- nutty, toasted, fresh, rich, lingering in the cup with a citrus sweetness. This winter, I noticed small, pale green, oval balls of fluff in the dry tea. "Oh, no! insects?" Dissection revealed no, not insects, but hairs from the leaf shaped into regular little balls by the rolling process.

The same friend brewed a bi luo chun in a glass gaiwan, showing me how to keep the temperature low and the pouring careful. The curled leaf opened beautifully and the taste was one-molecule-at-a-time delicacy, but intense. More vegetal than long jing, yet finer at the same time.

Liu an gua pian -- a different friend was busy talking and let the water boil hotter than I thought good for a green, then let it sit in a large yixing for longer than I would have let it sit, but it came out fragrant and fantastic. I've heard, too, of a long jing brewed by a farmer at boiling, boiling water that also came out at its best, so what do I know.

Imperial Tea Court is in that category of vendor I trust because the buyer seems to know tea and select the teas personally -- I've had good experiences with their teas. Have others?

Re: Famous Chinese Green Teas

My favorite green tea are Taiping Hou Kui. I've tried others too, and this one is best for me.

Re: Famous Chinese Green Teas

My favourite one is the Long Jin Shi Feng, maybe the most famous one! I usually drink it according to the Gong Fu Cha method, to appreciate the taste. I recently discovered an on-line shop that sells a very good quality of Long Jin: nannuoshan.org
They buy the tea directly from the growers in China: I can tell you feel the difference! Other Long Jin I tried before weren't so tasty.

Chinese tea enthusiast!

Re: Famous Chinese Green Teas

I also really like Long Jin Shi Feng. Its prolly one of my favorite green tea!

Re: Famous Chinese Green Teas

I enjoy Jasmine Pearl Superior Tea. This tea is made from Green and White leaves rolled by hand in to tiny pearl shaped balls, stunning!